Monday, May 19, 2014

Federal court: police can break down door and seize guns without warrant or charges

From Police State USA
MILWAUKEE, WI — The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that it is not a violation of constitutional rights if police break down a citizen’s door, search the home, and confiscate firearms, so long that they believe it is in the citizen’s best interest.

A Doctor’s Concern

The lawsuit stems back to an incident that occurred on May 22, 2011.  A psychiatrist, Dr. Michelle Bentle, phoned police to report that a patient had expressed a suicidal thought during an outpatient appointment; the woman had received some bad news and privately expressed grief during a difficult appointment.
At approximately noon, Milwaukee Police were dispatched to search for Krysta Sutterfield, age 42 at the time, in order to forcibly detain her and commit her for a mandatory medical evaluation.  In Wisconsin, the mere suggestion of suicide is grounds for forcible police detention.
Police had a description of Ms. Sutterfield’s vehicle but could not immediately locate her; police checked her garage and it was empty.  Hours passed.  At 2:45 p.m., Dr. Bentle notified police that her patient “had called her some minutes earlier stating that she was not in need of assistance and that the doctor should ‘call off’ the police search for her,” according to court documents.

Confrontation At Home

However, police did not call off the search.  At 8:30 p.m., Officer Jamie Hewitt found that Sutterfield was at home.  Sutterfield answered the door when police knocked, but would not permit them to enter.  She told them that she did not need assistance and had requested that the search be called off.  However, police would not take ‘no’ for an answer.
“Unable to gain admittance to the house,” the court summary states, officers “concluded that the police would have to enter it forcefully.”  Approximately 9 hours had passed since the doctor’s concern had been reported.
The showdown continued for approximately 30 minutes.  Police requested backup, and Ms. Sutterfield called 9-1-1 to attempt to call off the pushy officers.  As the call was in progress, police breached her door and accosted her.
The recorded 9-1-1 call documented Sutterfield’s voice demanding that police “let go of her and that they leave her home.”   Instead, she was shackled and detained against her will.
Despite having no warrant, officers helped themselves to a “proactive sweep” of the woman’s home.  During the search, police opened up a locked, opaque case and discovered her pistol.  Officers seized the pistol, as well as a BB gun (physically incapable of taking a human life), and her Wisconsin CCW license.
Sutterfield was taken into police custody and to a hospital for a forced medical evaluation at the county’s Mental Health Complex; the state’s forced evaluations can last for as long as 72 hours.

Operation Choke Point: Government using banks to shut out gun merchants

Gun retailers say the Obama administration is trying to put them out of business with regulations and investigations that bypass Congress and choke off their lines of credit, freeze their assets and prohibit online sales.

Since 2011, regulators have increased scrutiny on banks’ customers. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. in 2011 urged banks to better manage the risks of their merchant customers who employ payment processors, such as PayPal, for credit card transactions. The FDIC listed gun retailers as “high risk” along with porn stores and drug paraphernalia shops.



Meanwhile, the Justice Department has launched Operation Choke Point, a credit card fraud probe focusing on banks and payment processors. The threat of enforcement has prompted some banks to cut ties with online gun retailers, even if those companies have valid licenses and good credit histories.

“This administration has very clearly told the banking industry which customers they feel represent ‘reputational risk’ to do business with,” said Peter Weinstock, a lawyer at Hunton & Williams LLP. “So financial institutions are reacting to this extraordinary enforcement arsenal by being ultra-conservative in who they do business with: Any companies that engage in any margin of risk as defined by this administration are being dropped.”


Benito Mussolini would be proud of today's USA, where Fascism lives on in big companies and big unions willing to do the government's dirty work.